Tag Archives: art

What’s The Skinny: Motorcycling Without the Fat

The 2019 exhibition is free to the public and will showcase over 40 of the world’s top builders and artists at the Buffalo Chip this August.

Sturgis, SD (April 9, 2019) More than 40 of the world’s top motorcycle builders and artists will be offering their take on light and lean in the Sturgis Buffalo Chip’s 2019 Motorcycles as Art exhibit titled “What’s the Skinny – Motorcycling without the Fat”, curated by Michael Lichter. This collection of bikes, which includes a majority of custom bikes built specifically for this exhibition, also include bikes with historic significance. They will be displayed together only for this exclusive, seven-day event.  The gallery-style exhibit will give guests an open view of the bikes from every angle, with each bike displayed atop an elevated pedestal and lit with theater lights. The Sturgis Buffalo Chip will host the exhibit in a 7,000 sq. ft. dedicated gallery in its Event Center. The exhibit is open free to the public 2 p.m. to 10 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 3 through Friday,

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“Each year Michael brings together some of the most talented people on the planet to participate in this exhibit,” said Rod Woodruff, Sturgis Buffalo Chip President. “They all come together, creating a collection of motorcycles surrounding this skinny theme which is sure to inspire some real beauties. We’re very pleased to be able to offer such a world-class show free to the public.”

Nothing New is Young Again
There are no rules restricting the builders on type and size of tires, how much the primary can stick out or an absolute maximum width for the fuel tank and handlebars. Lichter based each builder’s inclusion solely on past bikes they have built and their interest in the “skinny” aesthetic. The bikes they build are limited only by their imagination and ingenuity, which is why industry professionals have been known to frequent the exhibit to pick up new ideas and trends.


“Skinny bikes aren’t new,” said exhibit curator Michael Lichter. “At the dawn of the 20th century, bikes were all very light. No sooner had they appeared and riders were racing them on board tracks. Skinny meant fast and has continued to do so in all forms of racing. One thing I love about the re-emergence of skinny bikes as a style is looking at them from the back; straight-on with their thin tires, clean lines, narrow primaries with exposed chains, and handlebars barely wider than their slim tanks. I’m excited to see what these builders are going to bring to the table this year.”

The Builders and Artists
A list of participating artists who will be displaying works consistent with the theme will be announced in the coming weeks. Some of the best pinstripe artists in the world, coordinated and including Ray Drea of Harley-Davidson, will also be contributing pieces.

The list of custom motorcycle builders and two-dimensional artists so far scheduled to present their skinny masterpieces at the 2019 “Motorcycles as Art” exhibit include:
Andrea Radaelli, Radikal Chopper – Milano, Italy
Arlen Ness, Arlen Ness Enterprises – Dublin, CA
Billy Lane, Choppers Inc – Daytona Beach, FL
BMW North America
Brian Buttera, Buttera’s Metal Werx  – Lakeland, FL
Brian Klock, Klock Werks – Mitchell, SD
Chris Callen, Flat Broke Chops & Rods – Tarentum PA
Chris Tope – Richardson, TX
Cristian Sosa, Sosa Metalworks – Las Vegas, NV
Cole Rogers – Springboro, OH
Dakota Toomey – Southampton, NJ
Dalton Walker, Split Image Kustoms  – Hanford, CA
Dan Rognsvoog, Cabana Dan’s Creations – Franksville, WI
Dave Perewitz, Perewitz Cycle Fab – Halifax, MA
Dorin Racz Arpad – Câmpia Turzii, Romania
Freddie Arnold, Hickory Flat Hot Rods – Canton, GA
Hawke Lawshe, Vintage Technologies – Columbia Falls, MT
Jack Deagazio – East Syracuse, NY
Jay Donovan, BareSteel Design – Victoria, BC, Canada
Jesse Srpan, Raw Iron Choppers – Chardon, OH
Josh Sheehan – Minden, NV
Justin McNeely, Hooked on Speed – Jackson, MO
Ken Nagai, Ken’s Factory – Nagoya, JAPAN
Kevin “Teach” Baas – Prior Lake, MN
Kyle Brewer, Paughco – Carson City, NV
Max Hazen, Hazan Motorworks – Los Angeles, CA
Michael LaFountain, Santa Clarita, CA
Mike Lange – Big Bend, WI
National Motorcycle Museum – Anamosa, IA
Nick Beaulieu, Forever Two Wheels – Windham, ME
Nick Pensebene – Edgewater, FL
Paul Brodie, Flashback Fab – Langley, BC, Canada
Paul Miller, PanicRev Customs – Calgary, AB, Canada
Paul Yaffe, Paul Yaffe Originals – Phoenix, AZ
Samuele Reali, Abnormal Cycles – Bernareggio, Italy
Takatoshi Suzuki, Seven Motorcycles – Sendai, Japan
Zach Ness, Arlen Ness Inc – Dublin, CA
For more information about the Buffalo Chip’s free-access Motorcycles as Art Exhibition visitMotorcyclesAsArt.com

About Michael Lichter
Michael Lichter began photographing custom bikes and the biker-lifestyle in the 1970s. Working with Easyriders Magazine since 1979, he has produced over 800 stories for them. Michael is also a regular contributor to 16 other publications around the world, has 11 coffee table books to his credit and exhibits his photographic art in galleries and museums in the USA and abroad. As a curator, Michael first started creating themed exhibitions with custom motorcycles and art in 2001 at the Journey Museum in Rapid City. In 2009, the annual exhibition was moved to the purpose-built 7,000 square foot gallery at the Sturgis Buffalo Chip where it was given the name “Motorcycles as Art” and continues to this day. Michael has operated out of the same commercial photography studio in beautiful Boulder, Colorado for more than 35-years. Visit www.facebook.com/lichterphoto, Instagram (whistlingmike) or the all new www.lichterphoto.com to see his images. Contact Michael atmike@lichterphoto.com.

About Motorcycles as Art
Every year the Sturgis Buffalo Chip’s indoor Motorcycles as Art exhibition presents a changing conceptual theme that brings together the most innovative collection of groundbreaking custom bikes from today’s premier builders with artwork from the most famed moto-artists. The Sturgis Buffalo Chip and curator, famed photographer Michael Lichter, present an environment that must be seen to appreciate. Free to the public and open for just seven days each year, all are invited to take their time and walk through history in the making that is the Motorcycles as Art exhibit.

About the Sturgis Buffalo Chip
The Sturgis Buffalo Chip® is the Largest Music Festival in Motorcycling®. It is the world’s first and leading entertainment destination for the motorcycle enthusiast, awarded AMA Track of the Year in 2016, American Flat Track Event of the Year and South Dakota Excellence in Tourism Innovation award winner in 2017. Since 1981, the venue’s high-profile, nine-day festival, known as The Best Party Anywhere®, remains one of the world’s most televised and longest running independent music festivals. Located three miles east of Sturgis, SD on 600 creek-fed acres, it offers six stages of entertainment, a swimming hole, bars, mouth-watering food, showers, cabins, RVs, camping and more to visitors traveling from all corners of the world. The Chip’s concerts and races are free with camping. The Motorcycles as Art exhibit curated by Michael Lichter showcases the works of the world’s best bike builders. Numerous bike and stunt shows and all shopping, live music and events at the CrossRoads are free and open to the public. More details are available at www.BuffaloChip.com.

Further Inquiries:
Nyla Griffith
nyla@buffalochip.com
605-347-9000
Cell: 605-920-0626
Sturgis Buffalo Chip

 

Mama Tried Show & Flat Out Friday 2017

Homegrown bike shows are the current thing: Handbuilt and Garage Brewed, for example. The early adopters of the concept are gatherings like the Brooklyn Invitational, the One Show and Born Free.

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Mama Tried in Milwaukee, held Feb. 17-19, is part of the more recent crop. Based on popularity and sheer numbers, it got traction fast in spite of changing venues three times in four years. Organizers added Flat Out Friday – a wild romp of sticky short track race action – the third year, and ice racing on Sunday (weather permitting), turning the show into a motorhead weekend.

Such an adrenaline-fueled weekend might only be possible in Milwaukee, a rust belt city with an industrial vibe that’s aided by the presence of Harley-Davidson, the H-D Museum and a solid brew-town heritage.

Mama Tried co-founder Warren Heir, Jr. was too busy to sit down and chat, but we stood and talked about the show as the crew set up. Read what he had to say then look at the pictures to see the bikes and get a feel for the show.

ITN: Who runs this show?
WHJ: Scott Johnson and I are partners in Mama Tried. Jeremy jumped on for Flat Out Friday as our partner for the racing last year. We also did a race in October. So this is our third race but fourth year.

ITN: So it was just the show the first two years then you added racing the third and fourth. Talk about the racing.
WHJ: It’s so much fun! We’re trying to bring racing back. Were trying to bring flattrack racing back in particular. I’m kind of new to flattrack and I really enjoy it. But it can be boring at some venues in the Midwest. It’s really made for the racers not the spectators, and it was stuck in the old school way of promoting. We wanted to turn it into a show. That’s why Flat Out Friday is a little flamboyant for a flattrack race but that’s what draws the crowd. And that’s what keeps the public interested. We can still stay true to racing but make it fun.

ITN: You have so many racers signed up!
WHJ: We had 140 in October. We have 240 this time.
It’s real racing, too. Some guy can come from California and not make the main because he wasn’t fast enough! You have to work hard, you have to be fast.

ITN: So how did Mama Tried get started?
WHJ: Scott Johnson, founder of the Rocker Box street event in Milwaukee, wanted to do something different. So he came to me, three, four times. I didn’t want to do a motorcycle show. I was jaded. I was raised going to motorcycle shows—my dad has a shop. They’re boring, it’s the same people, and I wasn’t into it.
And Scott talked me into it. He said let’s make it our own, let’s make it cool, let’s make it fun, let’s bring all our friends. Let’s make it a weekend thing, make it invitational. Let’s curate it and turn it into an artsy fartsy thing.

ITN: And what made it click?
WHJ: The reason why Mama Tried is such a success is because it’s in Milwaukee. It’s a community, a great city. Scott and I get the people here, but as soon as they get here and they experience the city they’re locked, they’re coming back. It’s a small town atmosphere with big city amenities.

ITN: You guys created a happening in four short years.
WHJ: It was insane! The first year we were expecting a thousand people and we got 10,000! It was a small place, too, really under the radar, super punk, in a construction zone in an old building downtown. Then it just snowballed.

ITN: So it was a perfect storm.
WHJ: Yeah. Scott was—and is—into racing quite a bit. He had that background and connections. I come from Harleys and choppers so I had connections there. When I met Scott I had just started racing.
So the idea beyond curating the show was to get like-minded individuals in the same room that wouldn’t necessarily hang out with each other, people who are not gonna cross paths unless you make them. I mix the bikes up (in the show display) so everybody has to hang out, not huddle together in their little scenes and cliques. I want the chopper kid to build a race bike and bring it next year. And I want the race bike guy to build a chopper.

ITN: Talk more about that.
WHJ: I want everybody to intermingle. I want the race guys to hang out w the chopper kids, the stock dudes to hang out w the weirdo guys. Then next year I want their conversations to spawn them to build the bike that’s different from what they came with last year. We all love motorcycles, but sometimes it takes a little push from the other side to get you to decide to try something else.

ITN: So it’s an invitational. Who do you invite? And how many?
WHJ: This year we said no more than 75. 120 later we’re still climbing. We have a problem with motorcycles.
We draw builders to the show based on personal connections and what we think is cool. We definitely need more female influence in this little world.

ITN: So just being invited is a nod of recognition for the builders, right?
WHJ: Yeah, we send invites and we made brass bottle openers for them this time. We rent the box at the Bradley Center and invite them for the races, make them feel special. Without them we wouldn’t have a show. We need them.

ITN: But no bike show winners, no trophies, right?
WHJ: We don’t like trophies. There are places for that, like with racing, but we’re not into it. Too many shows try too hard and do too much and it kills the vibe, it kills the vision. It’s gotta be natural.

ITN: How did you get Harley-Davidson involved in Mama Tried?
WHJ: It was a case of right place, right time. We went to see them and told them what we were gonna do. It’s been really easy, they’re great partners and it’s hometown. It’s not like: you sell your soul to the corporate partner. We can pretty much do whatever we want—except fly an Indian flag. That wouldn’t be respectful. Even with the racing, they jumped on in October with Facebook live and caught 500,000 views. So onward and upward! Let’s see if we can grow the sport more.

ITN: Anything else you want to say?
WHJ: I want to get across it’s a community thing. You come and hang out, we want you to experience Milwaukee. We make sure that there are multiple parties and pre-parties for people to go and have fun. It’s a weekend event. Milwaukee is coming along. It’s not quite Portland, but its cool to see it grow.

ITN: A lot of rust belt cities are being revived by younger people.
WHJ: I think it’s up to us. It’s our time. There are a whole bunch of rules now compared to when I was growing up, about what you can say and do. I like to find ways around them—and break them.

Show Cars, Motorcycles and Fine Art: A new exhibit opens at Railroad Pass Casino

1aIf you’re in Las Vegas for SEMA – or any other time – take note of this gearhead nirvana off the beaten path. Along with a collection of beautiful cars and motorcycles the all-new RAILROAD PASS SHOW CARS gallery, located inside the Historic RailRoad Pass Hotel & Casino, features larger-than-life motorcycle art. Included is the work of artist A.D. Cook, classic automotive paintings by Beti Kristof, exotic car photography by Jordan Shiraki, powerful race art by legendary NHRA artist Kenny Youngblood, and much more. Area artist A.D. Cook was contacted to develop the artwork portion of the exhibit and due to his contacts in the art and automotive worlds he brought together an impressive and delightful array of work with remarkable speed. 

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Where’s Railroad Pass Casino? No, it’s not on the famous Vegas strip and it’s not downtown, either. As the nation’s longest running casino and the third one licensed in the state of Nevada, it has far more history than that. Railroad pass was originally built as an entertainment respite for the construction workers building the Hoover Dam. In fact, visitors today can still see the 1800s-era safe and vault that for decades held payroll for both the Railroad and Dam workers. 

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That was in 1931 and the Railroad Pass Casino been operating ever since, celebrating 85 years in 2016. Since Joseph DeSimone purchased the historic property from MGM Resorts in 2015, it has seen upgrades and new features, such as the SHOW CARS exhibition. As Nevada DOT expands construction of the Boulder City Bypass expect Railroad Pass casino to enjoy substantial developments, too.

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Till then, we recommend a visit to the free SHOW CARS exhibit to  enjoy the cars and the fine art. You’ll find artworks by a variety of artists and an impressive collection of classic and eclectic cars — and everything’s for sale – original art, limited-edition canvas art prints and fine art photography.

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The Railroad Pass Hotel and Casino is located at 2800 South Boulder Highway, Henderson, Nevada 89002. http://www.railroadpass.com/

Custom Fanatics Inspired by Tattoo Themed Motorcycles as Art Exhibit

New Sturgis Buffalo Chip exhibit curated by Michael Lichter to be entitled Skin and Bones    Photos by Jack McIntyre, Iron Trader News

Buffalo Chip, SD (June 2, 2016) – Custom motorcycle craftsmen and tattoo artists study, research and work countless hours over many years, honing the skills required to become experts at their craft. The Sturgis Buffalo Chip® offers an exclusive look at some of the worlds’ most celebrated builders’ remarkable motorcycle creations as well as a handful of the motorcycling world’s most beloved artists and photographers in its “Motorcycles as Art” display. The 2016 exhibit, curated by eminent photographer Michael Lichter, is titled with the intriguing theme: “Skin and Bones – Tattoo Inspired Motorcycles and Art.” The exhibit is free to the public and will be open from Saturday, Aug. 6 through Friday, Aug. 12 in the Buffalo Chip’s Russ Brown Events Center.

Over 30 masters of the motorcycle industry have accepted the challenge to build a bike befitting the theme for the exhibit. Each of these rolling metal sculptures will have theater lights focused on them as they are displayed atop elevated pedestals to better give guests an open view from every angle.

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“These builders reach deep, spending the time, exerting the effort and wielding the skills required to create a motorcycle masterpiece for this show,” said exhibit curator Michael Lichter. “The bikes for this exhibit not only exemplify the theme, but also reflect the builder’s own personality and experiences, much like a tattoo.”

In addition to the magnificent display of motorcycles, the richly symbolic art of the late, well-known tattoo artist and oil painter Richie Pan (short for Panarra) will hang in the gallery alongside the works of eight additional mixed-media artists. Pan brought the oils of his paintings to rest in depictions of machines and people that evoke an aura of ink embedded in flesh. His love of everything motorcycle is evident not only in the subject matter and characteristic symbolism displayed in most of his pieces but also in how they are incorporated into occasionally irreverent depictions and curious design.

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“Michael Lichter has again put together an eye opening exhibit that exposes the core roots of the motorcycling culture that only the world’s leading motorcycle photographer could reveal,” said Buffalo Chip President Rod Woodruff. “Michael’s expertise and knowledge, gained from being an integral part of biker culture over the past 35 years, is inspiring and surprising the motorcycling world with another “Motorcycles as Art” exhibit that not only offers an exclusive perspective into the world of motorcycling, but highlights its stunning character. The chance to see this year’s exhibit is an opportunity no biker should miss.”

The Builders

The custom motorcycle artists scheduled to present their “Skin and Bones” masterpieces at the 2016 “Motorcycles As Art” exhibit are:

Aki Sakamoto – Hog Killers, California

Andrea Radaelli – Radikal Chopper Milano, Italy

Andy Carter – Pangea Speed, Utah

Bill Dodge – Blings Cycles, Florida

Bobby Seeger Jr. – Indian Larry Legacy, New York

Bryan Fuller – Fuller Moto, Georgia

Chris Callen – Cycle Source, Pennsylvania

Chris Eder – Misfit Industries, Texas

Craig Jackman – American Electric Tattoo, California

Dalton Walker – Split Image Kustoms, California

Dan Bacon Carr – DC Choppers, Texas

Eddie Trotta – Thunder Cycle, Florida

Eric Allard – FNA Custom Cycles, Florida

George Stinsman – Chaos Cycle, New York

Jason Grimes – Northeast Chop Shop, New York

Jeff Cochran – Speedking Racing, Indiana

Ola Stenegard, Ronny and Benny Norén, Sebastian Gutsch – BMW Motorrad, Munich, Germany

Pat Patterson – Led Sled, Ohio

Paul Cox – Paul Cox Industries, New York

Paul Yaffe – Paul Yaffe Originals, Arizona

Richie Pan Panarra – Darkstar Tattoos, New Jersey

Roadside Marty Davis – Flat Broke Chops, Florida

Roland Sands – Roland Sands Design, California

Ryan Grossman – Vintage Dreams, California

Shaun Guardado – Suicide Machine Company, California

Steve Peffer – Steel City Choppers, Pennsylvania

Teach Kevin Baas – Baas Metal Craft, Minnesota

Trent Schara – Atomic Customs, New Mexico

Trevelen Rabaual – Superco Customs, California

Will Ramsey – Faith Forgotten Choppers, Indiana

Yaniv Neevo Evan – Powerplant Choppers, California

Yuichi Yoshizawa – Custom Works Zon, Japan

More information can be found at: www.MotorcyclesAsArt.com

About Michael Lichter

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Michael Lichter began photographing custom bikes and the biker-lifestyle in the 1970s. Working with Easyriders Magazine since 1979, he has produced over 800 stories for them. Michael is also a regular contributor to 16 other publications around the world, has 11 coffee table books to his credit and exhibits his photographic art in galleries and museums in the USA and abroad. As a curator, Michael first started creating themed exhibitions with custom motorcycles and art in 2001 at the Journey Museum in Rapid City. In 2009, the annual exhibition was moved to the purpose-built 7,000 square foot gallery at the Sturgis Buffalo Chip where it was given the name “Motorcycles as Art” and continues to this day. Michael has operated out of the same commercial photography studio in beautiful Boulder, Colorado for more than 35-years. Visit www.facebook.com/lichterphoto, Instagram (whistlingmike) and www.lichterphoto.com to see his images. Contact Michael at mike@lichterphoto.com.

 About Motorcycles as Art

Every year the Sturgis Buffalo Chip’s indoor Motorcycles as Art exhibition presents a changing conceptual theme that brings together the most innovative collection of groundbreaking custom bikes from today’s premier builders with artwork from the most famed moto-artists. The Sturgis Buffalo Chip and curator, famed photographer Michael Lichter, present an environment that must be seen to appreciate. Free to the public and open for just seven days each year, all are invited to take their time and walk through history in the making that is the Motorcycles as Art exhibit.

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 About The Sturgis Buffalo Chip

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The Sturgis Buffalo Chip® celebrates 35 years as the Largest Music Festival in Motorcycling™ in 2016. It is the world’s first and leading entertainment destination for the motorcycle enthusiast. The venue’s high-profile, nine-day festival, known as The Best Party Anywhere®, remains one of the world’s most televised and longest running independent music festivals. Located three miles east of Sturgis, SD on 600 creek-fed acres, it offers eight stages of entertainment, a swimming hole, bars, mouth-watering food, showers, cabins, RVs, camping and more to visitors traveling from all corners of the world. The Chip’s concerts are free with camping. More details are available at www.BuffaloChip.com.

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Hazan Motorworks Engineering follows design

Story by Marilyn Stemp
Photos by Mark Velazquez

No, Max Hazan isn’t the first guy who learned the basics of fabrication as a kid in his father’s workshop. But it’s the rare person who takes such elementary foundations to the level of artistic expression Hazan has. And this bike is a standout example of being introduced to a craft or idea and taking it way beyond the expected.

To begin with, if you’ve seen other customs from Hazan Motorworks, you know they have little in common in terms of design. “I try to push myself to do something completely different every time,” said Hazan, who has turned his attention to BSAs, Ducatis and Ironheads in equal measure. “In terms of the overall design I try to work outside my comfort zone.”Silver Vegas 16

In this case, Hazan was inspired by a particular engine. Admittedly he’s not the first builder to be so motivated but the craftsmanship that followed from that point is so distinctive that it makes a specification list unnecessary. Why? Because 95% of the pieces on this bike are hand crafted.

Hazan calls the bike the Musket, the same name the engine builder gave to the motor when he developed it. Hazan had seen a picture of the Musket engine online and contacted the builder, a man from Ohio who had worked on the project for over 10 years. “He actually carved the bottom end of the engine out of a block of wood; that took him a year,” explained Hazan. “Then he had a cast made and machined everything on a Bridgeport mill. It is really a hand made engine.”Silver Vegas 13

Hazan bought the second Musket engine produced intending to build a bike around it for a customer who had given him total leeway on design – every builder’s dream scenario. After adding the kickstarter he altered the carb mounts to accept Amals for their better aesthetic proportions. “They get a bad rap but they work great. Especially with this engine, I wanted something that was elegant looking and sized right,” Hazan explained.

He constructed a rigid frame which was nickel plated then spent 10 days making four different tanks from multiple pieces until he was satisfied. He bent the exhaust pipes out of stainless in those perfect curves and fabricated the front end from scratch.Silver Vegas 22

Despite their slight appearance, these major components are quite strong and capable. “Everyone thinks it’s frail but I used quarter-inch thick wall tubing on the forks themselves and the other parts were carved out of inch-thick plate steel,” said Hazan. “It’s solid!”

Taking a clever approach to braking, Hazan cut open primary drive, spaced the drive out, eliminated the gear oil and hid a disc brake in the transmission. The bike is actually slowed through the chain. “Other people have done sprocket brake type setups but I don’t think anyone has put the disc brake in the trans,” he said, adding it runs fine dry; he simply oils the chain now and then if it looks like it needs it.

And that’s the beauty of building a custom like the Musket; there’s more latitude. “It’s not a race bike so I wasn’t crazy worried about spring rates and dampening. It just needed to ride well,” he said. “For a rigid, it’s pretty smooth.”

Aiding the ride are wide tires, which along with the wheels are the only components that were bought instead of made. Generic Harley-Davidson wheels came from eBay but even they were modified. Hazan used part of a Harley hub on the rear then machined the rest out of a block of aluminum.

An artfully engineered spring under the seat adds suspension, too. Speaking of the seat, it’s a separate work of art, fabricated by the builder from steel inlaid with mahogany of almost equal thickness. Though Hazan enjoys woodworking, it doesn’t mix well with metal working. Fortunately he has access to a wood shop on the 10th floor of the building housing his own shop in downtown Los Angeles, a city he calls home since moving from Long Beach, New York about two years ago.

Hazan works by himself in a second floor warehouse space that has lots of big windows and a freight elevator, located in a neighborhood he describes as okay in the daytime and a little sketchy at night. In a word: perfect. He chose the area because it reminded him of his old New York digs, before gentrification and skyrocketing rents.

He wasn’t in LA long before he discovered another east coast transplant nearby, Lock Baker of Eastern Fabrications. As it happened, when the shipper arrived to pick up Hazan’s bike for the 2015 Motorcycles As Art Exhibition at the Buffalo Chip, the driver said Lock’s place was his next stop. Said Hazan, “I had no idea, but it’s nice to have a neighbor like that.”

Essentially self-taught, Hazan has had to fill the gaps in his skill set as necessary and claims his biggest assets are being a fast learner and having an ironclad work ethic that dictates you learn something by doing it until you get it right. “I’m just kind of lucky that I can visualize things,” he said. “A lot of the details happen later, after you get the general idea.”

And that’s the nugget of the Hazan Motorworks approach to bike building: engineering to get the desired look. “It’s not that I put looks over something else, that’s where I start. I think of what I want to see then I think of what will work.”

Hazan Motorworks
www.hazanmotorworks.com
maxwellhazan@gmail.com